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CCPH 10th Anniversary Conference • April 11-14, 2007 • Hilton Hotel • Toronto, ON Canada
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Mobilizing Partnerships for Social Change

COMMUNITY SITE VISITS

Community Site Visits are a unique aspect of the CCPH conference and do not compete with other conference programming. Here’s your chance to get out of the hotel and visit innovative community-campus partnerships in Toronto! They provide an opportunity for conference participants to learn in-depth from local partnerships by spending about three hours touring and talking with the partnership's major stakeholders. The site visits represent a variety of definitions of “community,” “campus” and “partnership.” We encourage conference participants to ask questions and engage in constructive dialogue with their site visit hosts about the meaning of these terms and other issues.

Conference participants who are signed up for a site visit must gather in the Toronto Ballroom on Friday, April 13, at 12 noon for lunch and the site visit orientation before boarding buses bound for the community sites. You will leave directly for the site after the orientation. Participants will return to the hotel around 4:30 pm for snacks and a small group reflection. Transportation between the Hilton Toronto and the sites is provided by CCPH.

 

Site Visit Sign-Up Info

  • Site visit sign up is on-site, at the conference near the Conference Registration Desk.
  • Keep in mind that the number of people that can be accommodated at each site varies. Sign up early to get your first choice!
  • Space is available on a first-come, first-serve basis.
Sign-up desk hours:
Wednesday, April 11 10:00 am - 5:00 pm
Thursday, April 12 7:30 am - 3:30 pm
Friday, April 13 7:30 am - 10:30 am

 

Site Visit Descriptions

We encourage you to review the descriptions below and visit the websites of the hosting organizations for pictures and more information.

 

AIDS COMMITTEE of TORONTO (ACT)
~ Understanding and Addressing the Social Determinants of Health
~ Communities as Centers of Learning, Discovery and Engagement
~ Developing the Science of Community-Based or Practice-Based Evidence

http://www.actoronto.org
The AIDS Committee of Toronto (ACT) is a community-based AIDS service organization that provides support, HIV prevention and education services for people living with and affected by HIV/AIDS. ACT also has a substantial and well regarded community-based research (CBR) program. This program includes research studies, knowledge transfer and exchange activities, and capacity building to support the continued development of the agency’s services and the implementation of its strategic priorities. Research and research-related activities are conducted through partnerships with the respective stakeholders, including university-based researchers, policy makers, service providers, other community-based organizations and community members. ACT is the largest community-based AIDS service organization in Canada, and has been in existence since 1983. Our mission is to deliver responsive, effective, and valued programs that promote the health, well-being, worth and rights of individuals and communities affected by HIV/AIDS, and increase awareness of HIV/AIDS.

 

ANISHNAWBE HEALTH TORONTO
~ Understanding and Addressing the Social Determinants of Health
~ Communities as Centers of Learning, Discovery and Engagement

http://www.aht.ca
Anishnawbe Health Toronto is a primary health care organization and accredited community health centre funded by the Ministry of Health and Longterm Care. Our mission is to improve the health and well being of Aboriginal People in spirit, mind, emotion and body by providing Traditional Healing within a multi-disciplinary health care model.

The model of health care at Anishnawbe Health Toronto is based on our culture and traditions. Direction is provided by a volunteer Board made up of community members. Our centre is accredited by Community Organizational Health Inc. Health care services at Anishnawbe Health Toronto are provided by a wide range of professional and dedicated providers, including traditional healers, elders, medicine people, physicians, nurses, chiropractors, naturopaths, massage therapists, traditional counsellors, Enaadamged Kwe (Womans Helpers), Babishkhans, chiropodists, dentist, nurse practitioners, community health workers and others.

 

INDIGENOUS HEALTH RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM, UNIVERSITY of TORONTO
~ Understanding and Addressing the Social Determinants of Health
~ Communities as Centers of Learning, Discovery and Engagement
~ Developing the Science of Community-Based or Practice-Based Evidence

http://www.ihrdp.ca
The Indigenous Health Research Development Program (IHRDP) is a member of a national network of "Aboriginal Capacity and Developmental Research Environments" that are funded through the Institute of Aboriginal Peoples’ Health, Canadian Institutes of Health Research. The IHRDP is committed to a student-centered approach to community-based health research in Ontario. It focuses its resources on community-driven research projects that will identify health-related issues in First Nations communities. The partnerships between academic research institutions and Aboriginal communities and organizations also have a direct, positive impact on the conduct of community-based health research by developing culturally appropriate and ethical research methodologies, and improving the dissemination of research findings to Aboriginal communities; assisting Aboriginal communities in addressing important health priorities through research; and promoting dissemination and translation of research results to relevant decision-makers.

 

INJURED WORKERS CONSULTANTS
~ From Grassroots Movements to Policy Change
~ Communities as Centers of Learning, Discovery and Engagement

Injured Workers Consultants (IWC) is one of approximately 79 community legal clinics funded by Ontario's Legal Aid Plan. The clinic's work involves representation of injured workers having difficulty with their compensation claims, participation in law reform, and community development. As part of our community development we host a number of injured worker groups at the clinic: The Bright Lights, the Women of Inspiration, the Chinese Injured Worker Group, the RSI (Repetitive Strain Injuries) Injured Worker Group, the Loss of Retirement Income Injured Worker Group. These groups receive information, engage in peer support, and plan law reform initiatives.

 

ONTARIO FEDERATION of INDIAN FRIENDSHIP CENTRES
~ From Grassroots Movements to Policy Change
http://www.ofifc.org
The Ontario Federation of Indian Friendship Centres is a provincial Aboriginal organization representing the collective interests of 27 member centres across Ontario. The OFIFC is part of the National Association of Friendship Centres. The vision statement of the Friendship Centre movement is to "improve the quality of life for Aboriginal people living in an urban environment by supporting self-determined activities which encourage equal access to and participation in Canadian Society and which respects Aboriginal cultural distinctiveness." OFIFC member Friendship Centres specifically meet the social services needs of urban Aboriginal people in the social, cultural, economic, and community development areas by offering a wide variety of supportive programs and special projects.

The site visit will highlight the Indigenous Knowledge Networks for Infant, Child and Family Health project. The goal of the project is to enhance First Nations, Inuit and Metis infant, child and family health policy and practice in Ontario and Saskatchewan by developing, implementing and evaluating multi-jurisdictional, culture-based Indigenous knowledge networks in each province. A research plan and proposal for the larger project were submitted to the Canadian Institute for Health Research (CIHR) in September 2006. This project is headed by Dr. Janet Smylie working out of St. Michael's Hospital, an academic health centre fully affiliated with the University of Toronto. The research will be done in collaboration with the OFIFC and other partner organizations, including Seventh Generation Midwives and Tungisavingut Inuit Family Resources Centre in Ontario. In Saskatchewan, partner organizations include the Federation of Saskatchewan Indians, Canoe Lake First Nation and the Sagitawak Metis Council.

 

ONTARIO PREVENTION CLEARINGHOUSE (HEALTH PROMOTION AFFILIATE, CANADIAN HEALTH NETWORK)
~ Understanding and Addressing the Social Determinants of Health
~ Communities as Centers of Learning, Discovery and Engagement

http://opc.on.ca
The Ontario Prevention Clearinghouse (OPC), established in 1985, is one of Canada's longest-standing health promotion organizations. OPC services, offered in both official languages (English and French), are offered through five programs that focus on knowledge transfer and skill development, offering specialized training, consultation, resource creation and dissemination, and collaboration. OPC works in flexible partnerships, cross-sectoral coalitions and networks to bring about change and engage individuals, organizations and communities to improve population health at all levels. Through a partnership with the Centre for Health Promotion (CHP), University of Toronto, a Health Promotion Affiliate was established in 2004 for the Canadian Health Network (CHN). The Affiliate works with CHN to strengthen the health promotion focus of this bilingual, non-commercial and authoritative consumer health website (http://www.canadian-health-network.ca). Site visit participants will hear from, and engage with, students, staff and community partners on collaborative projects, try online tools and website tours, and take part in four project activities in OPC's Open House.

 

PLANNED PARENTHOOD of TORONTO
~ Communities as Centers of Learning, Discovery and Engagement
~ Developing the Science of Community-Based or Practice-Based Evidence

http://www.ppt.on.ca
Planned Parenthood of Toronto (PPT) is a pro-choice community health centre committed to the principles of equity and to providing accessible and inclusive services which promote healthy sexuality and informed decision-making to the people of the people of the City of Toronto. PPT provides primary and sexual health care and counselling for youth aged 13 to 29; outreach, educational workshops and health promotion initiatives in the community; sexual health information for teens through Internet, email, MSN instant messaging, telephone and outreach; anti-homophobia peer education workshops in community settings; community-based research; service provider training; sexual health programming for women, and peer-to-peer education volunteer opportunities.

PPT has recently begun to build its capacity to undertake research to support the implementation of strategic priorities. The site visit will focus on our current research project, the Toronto Teen Survey (TTS), a teen-led community-based participatory research study. Using a peer-to-peer model, the aim is to gather information from teens on assets, gaps, and barriers to sexual health services and will result in the development of a comprehensive, coordinated city-wide strategy to improve and target sexual health services for diverse youth communities. The project is a partnership between PPT, the University of Toronto, York University, the Ontario HIV/AIDS Treatment Network (OHTN), and Toronto Public Health. In this presentation, research team members will share experiences, challenges and best practice suggestions when working with diverse groups of youth on research and will include an exciting hands-on research activity component.

 

REGENT PARK COMMUNITY HEALTH CENTRE
~ From Grassroots Movements to Policy Change
~ Communities as Centers of Learning, Discovery and Engagement

http://www.regentparkchc.org/index.htm
http://www.socialwork.utoronto.ca/index.php?section=495
This site visit will feature a community-based research project with homeless women using a staged-photography method entitled, "Coming Together: Homeless Women, Housing, Social Support." The project is a collaboration of the University of Toronto Faculty of Social Work (PI: Professor Izumi Sakamoto), Regent Park Community Health Centre, and Sistering - A Woman’s Place, working closely with an advisory board of women who have experienced homelessness. The site visit will take place at the Regent Park Community Health Centre (RPCHC), which is a community-based health organization that promotes health and disease prevention through community ownership, accessible care, advocacy, and comprehensive care. RPCHC has provided services for people who are homeless since 1990 and is one of the three community health centres (of 23) in Toronto funded to work specifically with the homeless population. The site visit will consist of a tour of RPCHC, and a presentation from the "Coming Together" project. Participants will receive posters and a report from the project.

Prof. Sakamoto was recently nominated for the Community-Based Research Award of Merit for her contribution to the Coming Together project as the Principal Investigator, and was named an award runner-up. The award ceremony by the Centre for Urban Health Initiatives, the Wellesley Institute and the University College at the University of Toronto, will recognize her and her research team, and will be held on Friday, April 13 at the Toronto Downtown Hilton Hotel as part of the CCPH conference, where a research poster summarizing the project will be displayed.

 

SCHOOLS WITHOUT BORDERS
~ From Grassroots Movements to Policy Change
~ Communities as Centers of Learning, Discovery and Engagement

http://www.swb.ca/SWB/
Schools Without Borders is a youth-run organization that responds to the need to make learning accessible for today’s youth and provide them with the space and tools to make responsible and effective change. Recent programs include Creativity Unleashed: Community Innovations to Build Urban Peace and, currently in development, the Young Leaders program.

Creativity Unleashed was launched as part of the City of Toronto’s inaugural Humanitas Festival. In the week following, Creativity Unleashed took to the streets of the Greater Toronto Area (GTA) with a series of arts-based workshops, open dialogues, youth-led exchanges, school/community visits and performances by Movimento Na Rua – a band that comes from one of Rio de Janeiro’s most violent and marginalized communities. The purpose of this exchange was to share their creative responses to urban violence.

The main component of the citywide Young Leaders program is a six-month curriculum that brings together 25 youth from various "at-risk" neighbourhoods who are dynamic community leaders. For the six months following the program, youth will have continued access to the Resource Centre, workshops, be paired with a professional and peer mentor, devise strategies to strengthen their community investment, and be provided with employment and life opportunities.

 

SEATON HOUSE MEN'S HOSTEL
~ Understanding and Addressing the Social Determinants of Health
~ Communities as Centers of Learning, Discovery and Engagement

www.caisi.ca
Seaton House Men's Hostel, the largest shelter in Canada, includes the Annex Harm Reduction Program (North America’s first shelter program serving people who are homeless and alcohol addicted) and the Rotary Club of Toronto’s Infirmary (the first shelter-based infirmary for those with high medical and palliative care needs). The Client Access to Integrated Services and Information (CAISI) Project, which aims to end chronic homelessness and increase the well-being of people who are homeless by integrating care between multiple sites using an electronic information system, is the latest innovation developed out of Seaton House. While the Infirmary is a site of mandatory rotation for University of Toronto Family Medicine residents, both the Annex program and the CAISI Project have benefited from the diverse involvement of students and faculty from the University. The visit will include a tour of Seaton House, a discussion about these programs, and an opportunity for participants to try using the CAISI system.

 

SHERBOURNE HEALTH CENTRE
~ Understanding and Addressing the Social Determinants of Health
~ From Grassroots Movements to Policy Change

http://www.sherbourne.on.ca
Sherbourne Health Centre is a downtown, community-based primary health care centre. The Centre's services are focused on marginalized people including homeless people, newcomers to Canada and the lesbian, gay, bisexual and trans communities. Sherbourne has rapidly become a leader in LGBTT health care and has a range of medical, counselling, health promotion and community development programs. The Centre has worked with the trans community in the development of its hormone protocols and support services, but generally in Ontario this community faces severe discrimination and has great difficulty accessing appropriate, sensitive health care services. The tour will include a short presentation of TranPULSE research project – a collaborative effort to create knowledge about the effects of social exclusion in this community and, ultimately, to influence health and social policy

 

STREET HEALTH
~ Understanding and Addressing the Social Determinants of Health
~ From Grassroots Movements to Policy Change

http://www.streethealth.ca
Street Health is an innovative, community-based health care organization that provides services to homeless and underhoused women and men in downtown Toronto. Street Health's program areas include nursing care, mental health support, street outreach, HIV/AIDS prevention, Hepatitis C support, and identification replacement and storage. A large part of Street Health's work also includes advocacy. Street Health staff work as advocates for individual clients, helping them to access and navigate the existing health care and social service systems. Much of Street Health's work includes advocacy for systemic solutions that address the root causes of homelessness. Street Health staff participate in a wide range of health and social justice coalitions aimed at improving the social determinants of health. Community-based research and education are also key components of our work.

 

SUNNYBROOK OSLER CENTER for PREHOSPITAL CARE (SOCPC)
~ From Grassroots Movements to Policy Change
~ Developing the Science of Community-Based or Practice-Based Evidence

http://www.socpc.ca
Medical direction and oversight for emergency medical services (EMS) in Ontario is provided by designated base hospitals. In Toronto, Sunnybrook Health Sciences Centre, an academic hospital affiliated with the University of Toronto, has fulfilled this role since 1984. The Sunnybrook Osler Center for Prehospital Care (SOCPC) is a regional program which has worked with Toronto Emergency Medical Services (since 1984) and Peel Region Paramedic Service (since 2004) in providing community-based EMS, operationally, educationally and in research. Through Toronto EMS we have partnered with Toronto Public Health in vaccinating and sheltering hard to reach populations in the city. Projects include clinical studies in resuscitation, termination of resuscitation, identification and interventions in domestic violence against women and critical incident stress in paramedics. Attendees will participate in presentations and discussions with representatives from EMS, public health and our research team on examples of the projects cited above.

 

TORONTO CHRISTIAN RESOURCE CENTRE (CRC)
~ Understanding and Addressing the Social Determinants of Health
~ From Grassroots Movements to Policy Change
~ Communities as Centers of Learning, Discovery and Engagement

http://www.tcrc.ca
Created in 1964 as a mission agency of the United Church of Canada, CRC is a community agency involved in the areas of housing, food access and security, community initiatives and advocacy. The purpose of the Centre is not to work for but with people to help them discover a sense of their own self-worth.

CRC is situated in Regent Park in Downtown East Toronto and is involved in community development in a number of ways, including the Asset Mapping Research Project (AMRP), which brings participants together locally to share their assets (skills, talents, gifts, abilities, interests, experiences, knowledge and dreams) and other resources to build individual and community capacity. AMRP collaborated with key partners on the Inclusion Research project, Key to Women’s Health. Site visitors will engage with the project partners – Inclusion Researchers, AMRP, Centre for Health Promotion, India Rainbow Community Services, Ontario Prevention Clearinghouse, Ontario Women's Health Network, Region of Peel–Peel Public Health, and Sudbury Women's Centre and Toronto Public Health – and will be walking the neighbourhood in a community mapping exercise.
~ Photo of Inclusion Researchers: Silke Fischer, Defining Design ~ Photo of Regent Park: Eduardo Pereira Perez

 

TORONTO PEOPLE WITH AIDS FOUNDATION
~ Understanding and Addressing the Social Determinants of Health
~ Communities as Centers of Learning, Discovery and Engagement

http://www.pwatoronto.org
The Toronto People With AIDS Foundation exists to promote the health and well-being of all people living with HIV/AIDS by providing accessible, direct, and practical support services. People living with HIV/AIDS play a crucial role in the governance and operation of the Toronto People With AIDS Foundation, but, most important, are its heart and soul. Although the Foundation seeks supportive partnerships in fulfilling our mission, our response to HIV/AIDS is, more than anything else, inspired by the voices and experience of people living with HIV/AIDS.

In 2006 we served 5000 clients, have a staff team of 17 and a volunteer team of 200. Services include: Benefits and Assistance Case Management, Financial Assistance, Speakers Bureau, Food4Life Frozen Meal Delivery Program, Food Bank, Health and Wellness Programs, Treatment Access and Resource Services.

 

UNICEF CANADA and YORK UNIVERSITY
~ Understanding and Addressing the Social Determinants of Health
~ From Grassroots Movements to Policy Change
~ Developing the Science of Community-Based or Practice-Based Evidence

www.yorku.ca/akevents/academic/ee/index.html
UNICEF is working with 50 York University students in a fourth year market research course. York University students are gathering research information and assessing Greater Toronto Area high school students' perceptions of UNICEF to identify factors that would induce high school students' participation in fundraising and advocacy in support of UNICEF HIV/AIDS campaign.

The site visit will occur at York University and will feature a range of participants involved with the UNICEF initiative. Site visit participants will also have the opportunity to learn from Experiential Education (EE) students regarding a variety of aspects of Atkinson's quickly growing EE program, which in the spring semester alone sees 650 students and nearly 100 organizations working together on a wide array of campus-community activities. This number is expected to grow to 1200/200 (respectively)in the fall semester of 2007.



 

 
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