SPH Research Highlights

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Annual Stool-Based Tests an Alternative to Colonoscopy

Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, August 8, 2013
Most people can avoid the need for invasive colorectal cancer screening tests, such as colonoscopy, by following a regimen of annual stool-based tests.

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Dementia Linked to Blood Sugar Level

New England Journal of Medicine, August 7, 2013
Higher blood glucose levels are associated with a greater risk for dementia, even among people without diabetes.

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Phthalates May Alter Risk of Reproductive Disease

Environmental Health, July 25, 2013
Phthalates, man-made chemicals used in a variety of products, may have endocrine-disruptive effects in reproductive-age women, increasing or decreasing their risk of endometriosis.

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Unemployment Level Affects Health Care Choices

Health Services Research, July 16, 2013
A 1 percent increase in a state's unemployment rate is associated with a 1.58 percent decrease in preventive care services utilized, researchers found.

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Omega-3 Fatty Acids Linked to Risk of Prostate Cancer

Journal of the National Cancer Institute, July 10, 2013
Scientists have confirmed that high levels of omega-3 fatty acids increase the risk of prostate cancer.

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Vitamin D and Heart Disease Link Varies by Race

Journal of the American Medical Association, July 10, 2013
Low levels of vitamin D were associated with a higher risk of coronary heart disease in Whites and Chinese, but not in African-Americans or Hispanics.

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Shared Values Lead to Successful Nutrition Policy Strategies

Journal of Hunger and Environmental Nutrition, June 19, 2013
Unlikely allies should consider forming strategic partnerships based on shared values to create successful nutrition policy agendas, according to a study led by the Center for Public Health Nutrition.

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Whole Genome Sequence and Human Traits

Nature Genetics, June 16, 2013
The architecture of the genome can define traits that affect our bodies and our health - even the levels of so-called "good cholesterol."

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Weekly Yoga Classes Effective in Reducing Back Pain in Low-Income Minorities

Evidence-Based Complementary and Alternative Medicine, June 13, 2013
Once-a-week yoga classes were effective in easing back pain in predominantly low-income, minority adults.

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Group Therapy Helps Survivors of Sexual Violence

New England Journal of Medicine, June 6, 2013
A form of group therapy proved extraordinarily effective in helping women who have been exposed to sexual violence in the Congo.

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Acute Kidney Infection Linked to Use of Fluoroquinolones

CMAJ, June 3, 2013
Men who used oral fluoroquinolones, a commonly prescribed antibiotic, have a small, but significant increased risk of acute kidney infection.

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When Good Cholesterol Turns Bad

Arteriosclerosis, Thrombosis, and Vascular Biology, June 1, 2013
Diesel exhaust may prevent good cholesterol from battling the bad, artery-clogging cholesterol connected to heart attack and stroke.

Comparing Health Payment Reform Projects

Health Affairs, June 1, 2013
Researchers compared eight diverse health payment reform projects across six states to learn what helps and what hinders their successful implementation.

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Joint Supplements May Prevent Colorectal Cancer

Cancer Causes & Control, June 1, 2013
Glucosamine and chondroitin, two popular supplements for joint pain, may reduce the risk of colorectal cancer, a new study finds.

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Bullying Among WA State Youths

American Journal of Public Health, May 16, 2013
Bullying because of perceived sexual orientation is prevalent among school-aged youths.

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Potatoes and Beans Provide Most Nutrients Per Penny

PLOS One, May 15, 2013
Potatoes and beans are the most popular low-cost sources of potassium and fiber for school children, according to a study by the Center for Public Health Nutrition.

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Children Who Miss Well-Child Visits More Likely to Be Hospitalized

American Journal of Managed Care, May 10, 2013
Young children who missed more than half of recommended well-child visits had up to twice the risk of being hospitalized as children who attended most of their visits.

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Eating Peppers May Lower Risk of Parkinson's

Annals of Neurology, May 9, 2013
Eating peppers and other foods that contain nicotine may lower the risk of Parkinson's disease.

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Breast Cancer Survivors Not Exercising Enough

HemOnc Today, May 6, 2013
Most breast cancer survivors do not meet national exercise recommendations, and their activity declines over time.

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Air Pollution Linked to Hardening of Arteries

PLoS Medicine, April 23, 2013
Long-term exposure to air pollution may be linked to heart attacks and strokes by speeding up atherosclerosis.

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Racial, Geographic Differences in End-of-Life Kidney Care

Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, April 21, 2013
African-Americans with kidney failure were more likely than white patients to continue dialysis and less likely to be referred to hospice care, differences pronounced in regions with high levels of end-of-life Medicare spending.

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Walkable Neighborhoods May Not Increase Walking

Health & Place, April 19, 2013
Neighborhood walkability was not independently associated with greater walking among post-menopausal women when individual characteristics such as income and education were taken into account.

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Walking Speed and Early Death in Kidney Disease Patients

Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, April 18, 2013
Patients with chronic kidney disease who had slower walking speeds had a greater risk of death, according to a study by Baback Roshanravan and colleagues.

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Physical Activity Drops Over Time for Breast Cancer Survivors

Cancer Epidemiology, Biomarkers & Prevention, April 10, 2013
Most breast cancer survivors do not meet minimum recommendations for physical activity and their activity levels decline significantly after 10 years.

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Mammograms Every Two Years Best for Women 50-74

JAMA Internal Medicine, March 26, 2013
Women ages 50-74 who received a mammogram every two years rather than annually are not at increased risk of developing advanced breast cancer or large tumors.

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Colon Cancer Screening Doubles Using e-Health Records

Annals of Internal Medicine, March 5, 2013
Screening for colorectal cancer doubled when patients who had not been screened regularly were identified though electronic health records and contacted automatically by mail.

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Diet Contributes to Phthalate and BPA Exposures

Nature Journal of Exposure Science and Environmental Epidemiology, February 27, 2013
A study led by Sheela Sathyanarayana finds we may be exposed to bisphenol A (BPA) and phthalates in our diet.

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Changing TV Content Can Improve Children's Behavior

Pediatrics, February 18, 2013
Parents of preschool-aged children who switched to less violent screen content found their children behaved better, according to a study led by Dimitri Christakis.

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Many Patients Misunderstand Intrauterine Contraception

Contraception, February 10, 2013
Most women seeking primary care have inaccurate perceptions about the effectiveness and safety of intrauterine contraception.

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Night Shifts Linked to Ovarian Cancer

Occupational and Environmental Medicine, January 23, 2013
Working night shifts was linked to an increased risk of ovarian cancer in women 50 or older, according to a study led by Parveen Bhatti.

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Deep-Fried Foods Linked to Risk of Prostate Cancer

The Prostate, January 17, 2013
Regularly eating certain deep-fried foods is associated with an increased risk of prostate cancer, says a new study by SPH and the Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center.

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Less Reaction to Vaccines When Given in Children's Thighs

Pediatrics, January 14, 2013
Injection in the thigh rather than the arm is associated with fewer local reactions to the DTaP vaccine in children 12 to 35 months old, says a study led by Lisa Jackson.

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Heroin Overdose Antidote Kits Cost Effective

Annals of Internal Medicine, January 1, 2013
Distribution of heroin overdose antidote kits containing naloxone is likely to reduce overdose deaths and is highly cost-effective.

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Lung Cancer Mortality in African-Americans Linked with Segregation

JAMA Surgery, January 1, 2013
The rate of lung cancer deaths is higher in African-Americans than Whites and highest in African-Americans living in the most segregated counties, a new study finds.

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Global Burden of Disease Study 2010

The Lancet, December 13, 2012
The largest study of its kind shows that people are living longer but suffering from more disability from chronic diseases and injuries such as back and neck pain.

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Tire Traction and Lower Back Pain

Journal of Safety Research, December 1, 2012
Ergonomics researchers have found that the type of traction chain used on heavy equipment vehicles can impact a driver's exposure to whole body vibration.

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Commitment from Gil Omenn, Martha Darling for Genetics Research

November 29, 2012
A new research project fund at the Institute for Public Health Genetics has gotten a kick-start with a $100,000 commitment from former SPH Dean Gil Omenn and his wife Martha Darling. The first project will focus on evaluating potential gene and drug interactions, for example between long-term use of medications and disorders such as Parkinson's and Alzheimer's.

A Promising Public Health Dentistry Model for Cameroon

Human Resources for Health, November 26, 2012
Cameroon could expand access to oral health care by using more mid-level dental providers, according to a study led by Global Health MPH graduate Leo Achembong.

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Low-Level Air Pollution has Modest Effect on Fetal Growth

Air Quality, Atmosphere & Health, November 16, 2012
Exposure to low levels of air pollution in the Puget Sound area has modest effects on fetal growth, with important public health implications, says a study led by Sheela Sathyanarayana.

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Janitors and Cleaners Most Likely to Get the Flu

PLoS One Journal, November 12, 2012
Janitors, cleaners and secretaries appear to be more likely to catch the flu, while truck drivers and construction workers are least likely.

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Vitamin D May Help Prevent Tooth Decay

Nutrition Reviews, November 9, 2012
Vitamin D is associated with lower rates of tooth decay, according to a review of two dozen studies by Philippe Hujoel.

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Study Links Particulate Matter to Atherosclerosis

Journal of the American College of Cardiology, November 1, 2012
Long-term exposure to air pollution may be a risk factor for vascular diseases, according to a new study led by research scientist Ranjini Krishnan.

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Overcoming Barriers to Home Dialysis for Kidney Patients

Clinical Journal of the American Society of Nephrology, October 4, 2012
Only a fraction of patients with kidney disease use home hemodialysis, despite its benefits and cost-effectiveness, says a review led by Bessie Young.

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Food Deserts Exist in Seattle Area for Those without Cars

American Journal of Public Health, October 1, 2012
"Food deserts" dramatically increase in the Seattle area if you take away the car and factor in walking.

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School Awards Pilot Grants To Meet Challenges of 21st Century

SPH News, September 28, 2012
How does Twitter affect obesity? How can we engage diverse groups on the issue of climate change and health? These are some of the research studies funded by five innovative pilot grants just awarded by the School.

Vaccine Efficacy Increased against Certain HIV Viruses

Nature, September 10, 2012
Scientists co-led by Paul Edlefsen used genetic sequencing to discover new evidence that the first vaccine shown to prevent HIV infection in people also affected the viruses in those who did become infected.

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Genetic Risk Factor Found for Inflammation in African-American Women

American Journal of Human Genetics, September 7, 2012
Research led by Alexander Reiner has identified a gene difference that helps explain why African-American women have higher blood levels of a protein that may increase heart-attack risk.

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Text Messaging Improves Attendance at Follow-up Clinic Visits in Kenya

PLoS One Journal, September 5, 2012
Men in Kenya who received daily text messages after they were circumcised were more likely to attend a follow-up visit to check for complications from the procedure, according to a study led by Thomas Odeny, a post-graduate fellow at the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

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Lessons Shared from Restaurant Menu-Labeling Policy

American Journal of Preventive Medicine, September 1, 2012
People seeking to build a healthier environment through better nutrition can learn from the policy-making experiences in the Seattle area, according to a new study led by Donna Johnson.

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Americans Gaining More Weight Than They Say

Preventive Medicine, August 21, 2012
The typical American reported losing weight while obesity actually increased, according to research from the Institute for Health Metrics and Evaluation.

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Children Sleep Better When They Watch Less Violent TV

Pediatrics, August 6, 2012
Preschool-age children who switched from violent media content to programs like "Sesame Street" slept much better at night. The study was led by Michelle Garrison, acting assistant professor of health services.

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Why Our Bodies Can't Adequately Fight HIV

Journal of Virology, August 1, 2012
Michael Gale and colleagues have shed light on why the human body cannot adequately fight off HIV.

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Antiretroviral Drugs Show Promise in HIV Prevention

New England Journal of Medicine, July 11, 2012
Antiretroviral drugs can help protect healthy people exposed to HIV, according to a study carried out by the UW's International Clinical Research Center in Kenya and Uganda.

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Pregnant Ugandan Women Don't Always Use Mosquito Nets

PLoS One Journal, June 22, 2012
More than a quarter of pregnant women in Uganda who had access to insecticide-treated mosquito nets did not regularly use them, according to a study led by Laura Sangare, former senior fellow in Global Health.

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